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What to do if you are allergic to mosquito bites

Why are you allergic to mosquito bites and gnats?
Mosquitoes and midges belong to the same group of bipeds, so they have a lot in common. Only females bite. When they fill up with blood, they inject saliva into the wound. It contains proteins that prevent blood from clotting. They are foreign to the human body, so they cause the immune system to react.

Manifestations will depend on immune activity. People who have never been bitten, such as infants, may not react at all because their bodies have not yet encountered such proteins and do not know what to do in this situation. But most bites will swell a little, turn red, and itch. And some have severe allergic reactions.

Who is more likely to develop allergies to mosquito and gnat bites
The risk is higher:
Children;
Adults who first visit an area with an insect species that is new to them;
people with immune system diseases associated with the Epstein-Barr virus;
patients with mastocytosis, a rare disease in which mast cells containing allergy mediators accumulate in various organs and tissues.
Can allergy to mosquito and gnat bites be life-threatening?
Yes. Sometimes anaphylaxis, a life-threatening and dangerous condition, develops. Fortunately, these are exceptional cases.

Still, insect bites can be fatal: They carry dangerous pathogens such as malaria and yellow fever. But this has nothing to do with allergies.

Is it possible to know in advance if you are allergic to mosquitoes and midges
No. The structure of only part of the proteins in the saliva of these insects is still known, and diagnostic panels have only been used in research.

Therefore, you can know about the allergy only when a strange reaction to the bite occurred: massive swelling and unbearable itching in the affected area.

 

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